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Thread: Dail Boxley Dinwiddie, 1992, South Carolina

  1. #1

    Default Dail Boxley Dinwiddie, 1992, South Carolina

    http://www.angelfire.com/mi3/mpccn/dinwiddie.html

    Vital Statistics at Time of Disappearance

    Missing Since: September 24, 1992 from Columbia, South Carolina
    Classification: Endangered Missing
    Date Of Birth: April 12, 1969
    Age: 23 years old
    Height and Weight: 5'0; 96 pounds
    Distinguishing Characteristics: Light brown hair with blonde highlights, brown eyes. Dinwiddie has pierced ears. She has facial dimples. One finger on each of Dinwiddie's hands is disabled.
    NCIC Number: M-592497101
    <HR>Details of Disappearance
    Dinwiddie attended concert of the band U2 in Columbia, South Carolina with friends on September 23, 1992. The concert ended at approximately 11:15 p.m.; Dinwiddie and her group then stopped at Jungle Jim's, a nightclub in the Five Points' area of Columbia. Dinwiddie was last seen at approximately 1:30 AM on September 24 by an employee at the club. Her friends lost track of her at the club and assumed she had a ride home; they left at approximately 1:00 a.m. Dinwiddie apparently spoke to the bouncer for 15 minutes before walking out the door between 1:15 and 1:30 a.m. Dinwiddie was last seen walking north on Harden Street. She has never been seen again. She was wearing a long-sleeved olive green shirt, a bright blue LL Bean jacket tied around her waist, jeans and new white running shoes or brown boots at the time of her disappearance.
    Dinwiddie was missed at 6:15 a.m. when her father saw that the lights and radio were on in her room and her bed had not been slept in. He called all of her friends and none of them knew her whereabouts, so he reported her missing at 8:30 a.m. The Columbia police treated Dinwiddie's disappearance as a kidnapping, since everyone who knew her said it would be very uncharacteristic of her to leave without warning. She is described as a cautious person who did not like to be out alone.
    Investigators are probing the possibility that Reinaldo Javier Rivera was involved in Dinwiddie's disappearance. Rivera was charged with the murders of four Georgia women in 2000. Photos of Rivera are posted below this case summary. He was a resident of Columbia and a student at the University Of South Carolina in 1992, which was located near the Five Points area where Dinwiddie was last seen. Investigators are also looking into the possibility that Rivera was involved in the 1999 South Carolina disappearance of Paula Merchant. Authorities are uncertain if Rivera is connected to either Dinwiddie or Merchant's cases and no charges have been filed against him in connection with their cases. Interviews with him on the subject have not been fruitful. Rivera pleaded not guilty to the Georgia murders in July 2001. His trial date has not been established. He plans to use a defense of mental illness.
    Dinwiddie's case remains open and unsolved. She is an graduate of Randolph-Macon Women's College, where she majored in art history. She was planning on enrolling at the University of South Carolina for graduate school at the time of her disappearance.


  2. #2
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    New DNA technology could help crack case
    Dail Dinwiddie disappeared 14 years ago in Five Points area
    By LAUREN LEACH
    leleach@thestate.com

    Dan and Jean Dinwiddie hope the newly developed DNA profile of their daughter, Dail, will lead police to the person responsible for her disappearance nearly 14 years ago.

    Dail Dinwiddie was 23 when she vanished Sept. 24, 1992, during a night out with friends in Five Points. The graduate of Randolph-Macon Woman’s College in Lynchburg, Va., was preparing to go to graduate school at USC.

    The missing-person case is the oldest in this area in which police suspect foul play, Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott said.

    But authorities still receive tips in Dinwiddie’s disappearance. And within the past six weeks, authorities received a new tip in the case, Lott said.

    The lead did not pan out, but investigators looked at old evidence, including her hairbrush. They found a strand of hair and were able to get a sample of her DNA.

    They already had DNA swabs from her parents, Lott said.

    The new development is valuable because if an unidentified body is found, police can use that DNA sample, which is logged in a national database, to determine whether it is Dinwiddie.

    Or if police make an arrest and gather DNA evidence, they can run it through the database to see if it is a match to Dinwiddie.

    The technology was not available years ago.

    “This can be a big thing,” Jean Dinwiddie said. “We’re very excited about this.”

    Reach Leach at (803) 771-8549.

  3. #3
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    For parents of missing daughter, time passes but hope remains
    Posted Sunday, March 23, 2003 - 5:06 am


    By Eric Connor
    STAFF WRITER
    econnor@greenvillenews.co m

    If you have information about the disappearance of Dail Dinwiddie, call 1-888-559-8477 or 1-800-322-4453.


    She was the inescapable name and face, yet no one ever found her.
    More than 10 years later, the disappearance of Dail Dinwiddie is as much a mystery as it was that dark, early-autumn morning when the 23-year-old vanished from a busy Columbia entertainment district after attending a U2 concert.

    Her likeness has been affixed to countless light poles and store windows, circulated in bulk on airlines and, now, Web sites.

    Her name and face are a metaphor. She is a symbol — perhaps the symbol, not only in Columbia, but in South Carolina — for how the most unlikely of persons can simply drop off the face of the earth.

    For a decade, her parents have walked the line between hope and resignation.

    The recent safe return of Elizabeth Smart, the 15-year-old who was kidnapped from her suburban Salt Lake City home in June and found under bizarre circumstances, offers Dinwiddie's father, Dan, little comfort personally.

    But what the Smart story proves, he says, is that a family can never give up hope, no matter how long uncertainty tears at the soul and keeps a family frozen in a state of grief.

    "To give up hope is almost denying that there's a possibility that your child will come back or be brought back," Dinwiddie says of his only daughter.

    The Smart case is a mixed blessing of sorts for families of missing loved ones, and there are scores of them. As of March, 879 people, both juveniles and adults, were missing in South Carolina, the State Law Enforcement Division says.

    A roommate last saw Jason Knapp, a 20-year-old Clemson University ROTC student, in April 1998. Nine days later, Knapp's car was found abandoned at Table Rock State Park, where police believe he drove on the day he disappeared.

    Paula Merchant was 25 when she left home in Columbia in January 1999 to attend a meeting. She never showed up. Her car was found burning, but there's been no sign of her.

    A family must always be ready for the return of a loved one with the full understanding that it could never happen. The new hope that Smart provides comes at a painful cost.

    But moving on is something a family of a missing child cannot do, says Margaret Frierson, director of the South Carolina chapter of the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children.

    What if a missing person sees the family or a neighbor give up? Smart apparently heard her uncle calling for her during search efforts.

    "Until we have proof to believe otherwise, we are going to operate under the assumption that the child is alive," Frierson says. "Whether it's nine months, 10 years or 15 years, there is that possibility."

    To her family and loved ones, Dail Dinwiddie is not a symbol; she's a daughter, sister and friend. A reserved, sweet human being with an engaging personality.

    A woman who vanished.

    Harold Chambers, the semiretired Columbia police investigator who has spent a decade sifting through crank calls and promising leads that go bust, always finds himself back where he started — 1:30 a.m., Sept. 24, 1992.

    No evidence. No suspect. No witness. No idea where else to begin.

    Meanwhile, Dail Dinwiddie herself is frozen in time, branded into the public consciousness by her posterized face, her light-brown hair distinctively swooshed to the left.


    Strong roots

    Dail Boxley Dinwiddie had lived in Columbia almost her entire life.

    When Dail was a little girl, Dan and Jean Dinwiddie built a home in the upscale Forest Hills neighborhood, a community straddling the line between the affluence of Forest Acres and the poverty on the other side.

    From kindergarten to high school graduation, Dail was nurtured in an educational environment similar to her home.

    Heathwood Hall Episcopal School — a pastoral, pine-dotted campus where students feel free to leave their bookbags unattended — offered a comfortable bubble apart from the troubled neighborhoods around it.

    Jim Gasque, Dail's high school English teacher, watched her grow up. Gasque's late mother had been Dail's baby sitter. Dail was like "a surrogate granddaughter," he says, and his mother never got over her disappearance.

    Dail was a quiet figure, easily liked.

    "She had a type of charisma that made people want to be around her," he says.

    Probably because of her small stature — she was 5 feet tall, 96 pounds when she disappeared — she always seemed vulnerable, he says.

    Gasque remembers taking her on a 10-day trip to England with 18 other high school seniors. Dail's parents were going to wire her some money, but she didn't want to go to the Western Union alone.

    "She was the type student who was reluctant to launch out in the city without me," he says.

    Being small, Dail always found herself having to speak up to be heard.

    She had a sweet coating; she slept with her teddy bear, always, on into college. But underneath, others who knew her say, was a feisty spirit tempered with a sharp ability to judge character.

    Dail and her mother were close. When Dail was 9, she inspired her mom to take up horseback riding, and the two rode together avidly.

    When Dail reached college age, her horse, Double-Time, was sold to help pay tuition.

    In the fall of 1987, she enrolled at Randolph-Macon Woman's College in Lynchburg, Va., but transferred after a year to the University of Georgia.

    Dail had intended to take some specialized art courses, but she soon found she was allergic to the trees and grasses in Athens, Ga., and she returned to Randolph-Macon.

    After graduating in 1991 with an art history degree, Dail returned home to look for a job in art restoration. But slow economic times made finding work difficult.

    She hoped for better luck in Charlotte and found work at a frame shop. But the shop closed six months later, and Dail found herself back living at home in February 1992.

    She baby-sat to earn money while she volunteered at the Columbia Museum of Art, all the while preparing for graduate school at the University of South Carolina.

    By the time she finished grad school, she hoped, the economy would be better.


    A big night

    Sept. 23, 1992, was to be a memorable day in Columbia, even before Dail's disappearance.

    U2 was performing at Williams-Brice Stadium as part of its "Zoo TV" tour, and even those who didn't have tickets made sure to be a part of the social scene.

    The fall semester had begun, and many of Dail's old friends had returned from college or trips overseas and enrolled in law school, graduate school and medical school at USC.

    Dail was invited by a friend to be his guest at the concert, where they met two other old high-school friends.

    After the concert, the group went to Five Points, a college village of boutiques and restaurants. When night falls, it transforms into a mecca of revelry, where bars stay open into the early-morning hours.

    It was a Wednesday night. With U2 in town, the party started early that week, and Five Points was hopping.

    Dail and her friends ended up at their favorite watering hole, Jungle Jim's, in the heart of Five Points.

    Through the night, Dail's friends came and went, and by 1 a.m., she had gotten separated from them. About 1:15 a.m., she left Jungle Jim's after talking with the bouncer at the door.

    A few minutes later, she returned, looked around the bar, then left hurriedly, telling the bouncer goodbye. He was the last person to see her.


    The search for Dail

    Dail's father awoke about 6:15 a.m. that Thursday. As was his routine, he went upstairs to get the dog, which slept in his 16-year-old son's room.

    He noticed that the lights in Dail's room were on, as well as her radio. Her bed had not been slept in.

    It wasn't uncommon for Dail to call her father for a ride home if she needed it. Five Points is a long but doable walk from the family's home, though the neighborhoods along the way are potentially treacherous, and the drive is brief.

    Trying not to panic, Dan awakened his wife and began to call Dail's friends; his daughter was not one to leave the family worrying.

    About 8:30 a.m., her parents called the Columbia Police Department, which, at first, was reluctant to treat the case as a kidnapping.

    So many cases of missing adults are easily resolved: unexpected sleepovers, personal sabbaticals or sometimes a stint in jail.

    But as her parents described her personality, behavior patterns and demeanor on the night she left, the case was soon labeled a kidnapping.

    In the days and weeks that followed, everyone with ears to hear and eyes to see learned the name and face of Dail Dinwiddie.

    Her family was all over the news, with a parade of press conferences and rallies at the Statehouse and tearful pleas for her safe return.

    And the poster, everywhere — in the record store, on the lightpost, in the supermarket, passed out on passenger airlines and distributed nationwide.

    Within a week, Dail was featured on TV's "America's Most Wanted," and a benefit concert at the bar where she was last seen helped raise a $2,500 reward to $50,000.

    The strong support network of Heathwood Hall rallied to her cause. Young men and women stood in street medians, holding pictures of Dail, passing out fliers.

    Nothing.

    "One day she was here, one day she wasn't," her father says.


    A frustrating case

    Columbia police investigator Harold Chambers has the look of an old grandpappy; his beige Members Only jacket, a relic of the 1980s, screams unassuming.

    But his blue eyes pierce, and beneath his polite stoicism is a grandfather who doggedly wants to bring a child home.

    Chambers, now a 35-year veteran, was assigned to the case from the start, and he has put off retirement in part to solve it.

    He acts not only as investigator, but also as a counselor to the Dinwiddies, available at all times whenever they need to talk about theories or frustrations.

    The job of cracking the case has been nothing if not frustrating for the grizzled investigator.

    "You just can't fathom it," Chambers says. "Absolutely, it's frustrating."

    He doesn't entertain theories of what might have happened, for fear his imagination might be closed to any possibility.

    Columbia police, the Richland County Sheriff's Office, the State Law Enforcement Division and the FBI have followed hundreds of leads since the police canvassed Five Points and the possible foot path home to Forest Hills shortly after Dail's disappearance.

    The first 72 hours, says Columbia Police Capt. Steve Conley, is the best window to solve a missing persons case. From there, the trail only gets colder.

    Investigators interviewed residents, looked in underground water lines and checked abandoned houses along the way.

    Early on, police thought they might have had their guy. The morning of Dail's disappearance, a man was seen in Five Points forcing a woman into a car.

    Investigators located him in Anderson County and brought him to Columbia. After interviewing him and a Sumter woman — his girlfriend — it became clear she was the one forced into the car that morning.

    "It sounded real good to start with," Chambers says. "We thought we had it, but it fizzled out on us like so many more have."

    Conley says the Dinwiddie case is perplexing: no crime scene, no witness among a crowd of thousands, and no one enticed by the $50,000 reward.

    There is, however, that night, particularly memorable because of the concert, Conley says. Someone, somebody, had to have seen something, but no one is talking.

    "People tend to run their mouth," he says. "It's frustrating with the amount of reward out there, when 99 times out of a hundred, a lot of people on the street would give up their brother for 500 bucks, I don't care what he did."

    The only information police have ever received, Conley says, is murky at best — someone "acted strange" or "looked like."

    The family and law enforcement have even entertained the visions of psychics, in hopes of any kind of lead.

    Whenever an accused serial killer, kidnapper or rapist with a tie to Columbia is caught, investigators search for a link to Dail and other missing people.

    That was the case in the fall of 2000 with the capture of Reinaldo Rivera.

    In pretrial hearings, Rivera has admitted he raped and killed four young women beginning in 1999 in the Augusta, Ga., area. His attorney is defending him on the grounds of mental illness.

    Around the time of Dail's disappearance, the now 38-year-old Rivera lived in Columbia and was a student at USC.

    Investigators interviewed Rivera but could find no link. Rivera had left a suicide note listing his victims, Chambers says, and denied any involvement with Dinwiddie (or Paula Merchant).

    The trail of Dinwiddie's case has passed through places such as Las Vegas, Atlanta and Clarksville, Tenn. Police have "three file cabinets full" of leads.

    The number of leads today has trailed off compared with a decade ago, when investigators could barely keep up with the flood of information.

    But they still get them.

    Last month, Conley and SLED agents spent two days in Minnesota interviewing a man in jail who was said to be involved with her disappearance.

    Authorities couldn't find a connection, but they have not exhausted that lead and plan to investigate it further, says SLED special agent Dave Lawrence.

    Too often, leads are built on what turns out to be a prank. Once, police received a tip that Dail's body was buried off Fish Hatchery Road southwest of Columbia.

    Conley and Chambers arrived and found mounds on the property and had no choice but to dig them up with a backhoe. Eventually, they traced the call to a pay phone at USC; the date was April Fool's Day.

    Some people have tried to pin the disappearance on a rival for revenge. Inmates have used supposed knowledge of her disappearance as leverage to try to get out of jail.

    Such is the nature of a high-profile case: a lot of potential leads but also a mess of misinformation. But investigators agree the high profile gives them a better chance of solving it.

    "It seems to be the case that will not go away, which is a good thing," Lawrence says.


    Holding on to hope

    "I'd love to see her walk through that door, like that little Smart girl," Chambers says. "Who knows? The day before Elizabeth Smart was found, no one knew if she was alive."

    But Dail wasn't 14, and if she had a chance to escape, she likely would.

    Because of that, investigators aren't planning to do an age-enhanced sketch of what Dail would look like at 33, soon to be 34 on April 12.

    "Here, you're dealing with, if the opportunity presented itself, I feel certain she would make some kind of contact with authorities or home," Conley says.

    Chambers says SLED tried to do an age-enhanced sketch four years ago, but it "didn't work out."

    Hope in the Dinwiddie home is a commodity bought at an exorbitant price. Holding onto it has taken its toll.

    The Dinwiddies watch TV's "America's Most Wanted" and "American Justice," Dan says, "not for the voyeur value, but to see if maybe there's something we haven't thought about. Maybe we could tie that in."

    Dan says he and his wife handle the loss differently. From day to day, talking about their daughter doesn't come easier, it's measured by how less difficult it is.

    To talk about her daughter's case, Jean must reacquaint herself with a box of photos and news clippings. Dredging up the memories is like picking a scab from a wound that has not healed.

    But, there is the hope.

    "As a family, we're very private," Dan says. "We don't relish the publicity. The only reason we do this is because, one day, something that somebody has written or said might cause somebody to remember something and find Dail."

    At any moment at the Dinwiddie home, an upsetting call can come — from an investigator, a prankster, a reporter, a tipster — the kind that Dan says "always makes our hearts go back in our throats."

    At 3 in the morning, a woman called the Dinwiddie home, drunk, to let them know she was looking for their daughter in Five Points — a few years too late.

    Sometimes, the calls are entirely well-meaning.

    Dan says he got a call from a man in a bar in Green Bay, Wis., one night: "He said, 'I know that your daughter is here in the bar tending bar.'"

    By the next morning, law enforcement had met up with the woman in Green Bay. She indeed bore a striking resemblance to Dail, but she was nearly 6 feet tall.

    Still, it was that type of dogged concern that found Elizabeth Smart. A couple passing by on a suburban Salt Lake City road insisted on following their instinct when they recognized Smart's suspected abductor from a sketch.

    The public's vigilance is the only comfort Dail's father finds in the Smart story. Dail's case is entirely different.

    He knows if his daughter is ever to be found, it will be because people speak up about what they know, whether they realize they know it or not.

    "I was very encouraged that the citizens found this child," he says. "The citizenry: That's who's going to find Dail. Insist. Just insist."

    And never give up hope, no matter how much it hurts.
    http://greenvilleonline.com/news/200...0303233381.htm
    Last edited by Starless; 06-11-2008 at 11:41 PM.

  4. #4
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    http://www.crimerant.com/?p=213

    When a Friend Goes Missing
    [CR Note: Novelist JT Ellison knows first hand how it feels when a friend or loved one goes missing. When Crime Rant found out about her — Gregg is a member of the Killer Year debut thriller writers group with JT — we asked her share a guest blog on the subject. You Maybe someone out there knows something and can help?]

    Guest Blog by JT Ellison

    On September 24, 1992, Dail Boxley Dinwiddie disappeared from Columbia, South Carolina.

    It happens everyday. You hear it on the news, read it in the papers, see alerts on the highway signs. And with the advent of the 24-hour news cycle, Amber Alerts and a more responsive police force, these commonplace disappearances sometimes end with good news. I wish that could happen for Dail.

    The facts of this case are cut and dried. On the evening of September 23, 1992, Dail attended a U2 concert. When the concert ended, she headed down to the Five Points area of Columbia with a few friends. They finished the evening at a bar called Jungle Jim’s. She got separated from her friends, and spoke to the bouncer at approximately 1:15 a.m. – 1:30 a.m. He remembers her leaving the bar as if she was going to walk home. She went north on Harden Street. And then she simply disappeared.

    She was wearing an olive green long sleeved shirt, a blue LL Bean jacket tied around her waist, faded blue jeans and brown boots. She’s barely five feet tall and less than 100 pounds, has light brown hair and brown eyes. Her ears are pierced, and she has a crippled finger on each hand.

    On every missing poster, under circumstances of disappearance, the words UNKNOWN and ENDANGERED MISSING appear. The posters, which were plastered everywhere we could get them, all over the country, read:

    KIDNAPPED. $50,000 REWARD for INFORMATION LEADING TO THE ARREST AND CONVICTION OF PERSON OR PERSONS RESPONSIBLE FOR THE KIDNAPPING OF DAIL DINWIDDIE.

    Despite a $50,000 reward, no credible links have been made to Dail’s disappearance.

    What happened to Dail? She wasn’t the type of girl to just run off. She lived at home, was taking art classes with an eye on graduate school (she majored in Art History at Randolph-Macon Woman’s College.) Her parents and close friends immediately knew something was dreadfully wrong; she just wouldn’t have not come home, not called, if she could.

    Dail and I went to college together. I don’t claim to be one of her closest friends. Though RMWC is a small school, she and I didn’t cross paths until senior year. The Dail I remember was a bright, fun woman whose smile could light up a room. She had an infectious laugh. She was smart as a whip.

    I remember getting that phone call – Did you hear? Dail’s gone missing. I remember how my heart sank. How I felt like there was nothing I could do. How my fervent prayers went unanswered, and slowly, over the years, Dail’s face faded from the news cycle.

    I have a little bit of Dail’s case in each of my books, something of a tribute to her. She has become a number, which saddens me. She’s in the Nation’s Missing Children Organization and Center for Missing Adults (MPCCN Case File 455F90) She is part of the Doe Network (Case File 635DFSC), and The Kristen Foundation (Investigative Case Number 92-31749). She is listed in news stories, columns, even appears in Wikipedia under the heading of Missing White Girl Syndrome.

    None of that is important. Finding Dail is all that matters. If you know anything, or think you know someone who might, please call the Columbia Police Department at 803-545-3525, or the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division (SLED) at 803-737-9000.

    The case is open, and they’ll listen to anything you have to say.

  5. #5
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    Vital Statistics at Time of Disappearance


    Missing Since: September 24, 1992 from Columbia, South Carolina
    Classification: Endangered Missing
    Date Of Birth: April 12, 1969
    Age: 23 years old
    Height and Weight: 5'0; 96 pounds
    Distinguishing Characteristics: Light brown hair with blonde highlights, brown eyes. Dinwiddie has pierced ears. She has facial dimples. One finger on each of Dinwiddie's hands is disabled.
    NCIC Number: M-592497101


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Details of Disappearance
    Dinwiddie attended concert of the band U2 in Columbia, South Carolina with friends on September 23, 1992. The concert ended at approximately 11:15 p.m.; Dinwiddie and her group then stopped at Jungle Jim's, a nightclub in the Five Points' area of Columbia. Dinwiddie was last seen at approximately 1:30 AM on September 24 by an employee at the club. Her friends lost track of her at the club and assumed she had a ride home; they left at approximately 1:00 a.m. Dinwiddie apparently spoke to the bouncer for 15 minutes before walking out the door between 1:15 and 1:30 a.m. Dinwiddie was last seen walking north on Harden Street. She has never been seen again. She was wearing a long-sleeved olive green shirt, a bright blue LL Bean jacket tied around her waist, jeans and new white running shoes or brown boots at the time of her disappearance.
    Dinwiddie was missed at 6:15 a.m. when her father saw that the lights and radio were on in her room and her bed had not been slept in. He called all of her friends and none of them knew her whereabouts, so he reported her missing at 8:30 a.m. The Columbia police treated Dinwiddie's disappearance as a kidnapping, since everyone who knew her said it would be very uncharacteristic of her to leave without warning. She is described as a cautious person who did not like to be out alone.
    Investigators are probing the possibility that Reinaldo Javier Rivera was involved in Dinwiddie's disappearance. Rivera was charged with the murders of four Georgia women in 2000. Photos of Rivera are posted below this case summary. He was a resident of Columbia and a student at the University Of South Carolina in 1992, which was located near the Five Points area where Dinwiddie was last seen. Investigators are also looking into the possibility that Rivera was involved in the 1999 South Carolina disappearance of Paula Merchant. Authorities are uncertain if Rivera is connected to either Dinwiddie or Merchant's cases and no charges have been filed against him in connection with their cases. Interviews with him on the subject have not been fruitful. Rivera pleaded not guilty to the Georgia murders in July 2001. His trial date has not been established. He plans to use a defense of mental illness.
    Dinwiddie's case remains open and unsolved. She is an graduate of Randolph-Macon Women's College, where she majored in art history. She was planning on enrolling at the University of South Carolina for graduate school at the time of her disappearance.




    http://www.fcso.org/missing/scmissing.html

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Investigating Agency
    If you have any information concerning this case, please contact:
    Columbia Police Department
    803-233-8474
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails a.jpg  

  6. #6
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    http://www.wistv.com/Global/story.asp?s=5013987

    DNA profile of missing Columbia woman created 14 years later


    (Columbia-AP) June 10, 2006 - Authorities have created a DNA profile of a missing Columbia woman nearly 14 years after she disappeared.

    Dail Dinwiddie was a 23-year-old college student when she disappeared in September 1992 during a night out in Columbia.

    Sheriff Leon Lott says a new tip six weeks ago led Richland County deputies to revisit her disappearance.

    The tip didn't pan out, but investigators looking at old evidence found a strand of hair on Dinwiddie's brush and used it to get a sample of her DNA.

    Before, investigators only had DNA from Dinwiddie's parents.

    The DNA will be logged into a national database and could be used to identify a body or help if police make an arrest.

    Posted 2:53pm by Graeme Moore

  7. #7

    Default Re: Dail Boxley Dinwiddie, 1992, South Carolina

    http://www.thestate.com/news/local/a...174125646.html

    COLUMBIA, SC The parents of Dail Dinwiddie appealed Tuesday for anyone with information about their daughter’s disappearance 25 years ago from Five Points to contact authorities.
    Dail Dinwiddie, 23, disappeared after she left a Five Points bar — Jungle Jim’s, which has since closed — on Sept. 24, 1992. The 25th anniversary of her disappearance is Sunday.
    She disappeared the same night that the rock band U2 performed at Williams-Brice Stadium.
    Hers is the oldest missing persons case for Columbia police, with more than 1,000 leads investigated. The mystery has attracted national attention. U2 highlighted her at a concert weeks later.


    The State requested an interview with the Dinwiddies, Dan and Jean. They declined, noting in their statement Tuesday that they want the attention to be on their daughter.



    Here is their statement:

    “On .... Sept. 24, 1992, 25 years ago, our daughter Dail (23 years old) disappeared from Five Points in Columbia, S.C. She was last reported in the area of Harden and Greene Sts.

    “She was in Five Points with friends after attending a U2 concert.

    “A huge crowd was in Five Points and she lost touch with her friends and began to search for them. She was last seen walking toward (the) Harden and Greene St. intersection.

    “Anyone with information about Dail’s disappearance should contact Richland County Sheriff Leon Lott at (803) 576-3021. One may also contact Columbia Police Department investigator Mark Vinson at (803) 315-3750.”

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