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Thread: Unidentified Female, Located March 9, 1981, Glades County, FL

  1. #11

    Default Re: Unidentified Female, Located March 9, 1981, Glades County, FL

    Miami Herald, The (FL)
    February 20, 1983
    Edition: FINAL
    Section: SPORTS
    Page: 1M







    A BOATER'S PARADISE

    Author: ERIC SHARP Herald Staff Writer











    Article Text:
    The greatest thing about boating in South Florida is that no matter how much time you have, there is always something interesting to do. If you only have a couple of hours, you might decide to check out the cruise ships in Miami Harbor, or see what the waterfront condo set is up to in Broward.
    Got a long weekend? There's the Polynesian island atmosphere of South Biscayne Bay, or the Okeechobee Waterway, both areas strangely terra incognita to skippers who live within a couple of hours trailering distance.
    And if you have a week, take the boat all the way through the Keys or to Florida's lower West Coast, sleeping aboard or at shoreside facilities as the boat allows and the mood strikes you.
    Although the idea of traveling by boat is nothing new to seasoned skippers, the great majority of small boat owners
    rarely spend the night on or travel very far on their craft. To an amazing number of them, a boat is something they use for a few hours at a time, and virtually always on the same stretch of water.
    Here is some information about some of the more interesting and enjoyable cruises available to South Florida's boating
    families. May you have as much fun checking out our recommendations as we have had gathering the information for them.
    Biscayne Bay
    Take your boat into the middle of South Biscayne Bay on a pleasant Sunday, say about five miles south of the Rickenbacker Causeway drawbridge. Now cut the engine, or slow up and let her
    drift. Relax and look around you.
    Unless it is Super Bowl Sunday, you will see dozens of sailboats and powerboats going about their pleasure on what is probably the finest body of water in the United States for a small boater whose activity is mostly confined to day trips.
    Puget Sound is nice, and the shores there are more scenic. But anyone who has sailed there will tell you that the tides are horrendous, that you must constantly be alert for half-submerged logs the size of a small whale, and that being caught in a Puget Sound fog is an experience you will take to your grave.
    Long Island Sound is great -- though a bit too crowded -- from June to September. The weather may be adequate for boating before and after those months, but stick a foot in the water and you will discover why Long Island skippers tend to sail a four-month season. And that goes double for the beautiful, rock-bound coast of Maine.
    California boating is fine if you're into cold water and running up and down a coastline where you'll be lucky to find a harbor every 50 miles.
    Boaters in most parts of the country would give their eye teeth to have what you see before you now -- a protected body of warm water that offers virtual year-round boating and something to look at other than waves.
    Red Marston, the dean of America's boating writers, says in his book, Cruising Florida: "Those who live close by and cruise
    South Biscayne Bay> routinely for years may take it for granted. Others, who have never seen it, may merely assume that under the lee of such a huge metropolitan area as Miami, a major cruising ground could not survive with any measure of beauty retained. The truth is that Biscayne Bay is easily one of Florida's finest cruising grounds."
    The bay does get crowded. On a typical weekend, one-design sailboats will be locked in mortal combat on a triangle course, sometimes half-dozen classes at the same time.
    Cruising sailboats will be holding their own race, with crews yelling advice to each other and screaming warnings at other boats as they tack and jibe around the bay's daymarks.
    Amid the organized chaos of the racing fleets, you will find
    families out for a day trip around the green waters, or maybe heading for a picnic on Key Biscayne.
    Then there will be powerboats of all sizes. Small outboards and inboard-outboards like to anchor around the daymarks as their crews fish for trout, snapper and grunts.
    Off to the east, south of the tip of Key Biscayne, other small powerboats will be anchored in the finger channels. A few will be right up on the flats, one guy poling the boat through the shallows while another stands at the other end and watches carefully for bonefish.
    Sports fishermen and motor yachts will be pulling large wakes and drawing an inordinate number of curses, the latter in direct proportion to the amount of water displaced.
    Due west is the green shoreline marking Matheson Hammock State Park. No Name Harbor, a nice little lunch stop in Bill Baggs State Park at the tip of Key Biscayne, is a little farther to the east.
    If you need a pit stop for fuel or refreshment, Dinner Key and Crandon Marina are only minutes away in a powerboat, maybe an hour under sail, and both offer a place to tie up and have lunch or supper.
    If you want to go offshore, you can slip through the Cape Florida Channel at the tip of Key Biscayne, or the Biscayne Chan- nel a couple of miles farther south, or run back north through the Rickenbacker bridge and pop out Norris or Government Cuts.
    Miami River
    If you're looking for the weird boat capital of the United States, take a trip up the Miami River.
    One of the river's charms is that every five minutes or so you'll come across strange craft in various states of renovation (or dissolution), and you'll wonder aloud, "What are they going to do with that thing?"
    This is a very short trip, only about six miles from the mouth a half-mile south of the Dodge Island Bridge to the dam that stops you at 36th Street and 39th Avenue.
    In that six miles, you're likely to come across anything
    from voodoo ladies making sacrifices to water gods to a Haitian boat loaded with everything from cooking oil to used mattresses on its way home.
    This also is a very slow trip, usually made at five miles an hour or so, because the no-wake laws are rigidly enforced. Even if no marine patrol officers are around to spot you, speeding in the narrow confines of the river will draw the loud and prolonged ire of the thousands of boat owners along the banks.
    It's a great jaunt for sailboats or powerboats, but sailboat skippers must blow for six to eight bridges to open, depending on the height of the mast.
    This is a great day trip on which to entertain out-of-town guests. Amble up in the morning, tie up for lunch at any of four riverfront restaurants -- East Coast Fish Market, Alonzos, the Miami Raw Bar, or the Centro Espanol -- and then enjoy a relaxed trip home before dark.
    Viani Navarrete, skipper of a successful local racing yacht called Scoundrel, has lived on the river for five years and remains fascinated by its comings and goings. He admits that he and his wife, "sometimes just get in the Zodiac and run up and down to see all the characters."
    The river is the center of the Miami commercial fishing industry, with lobster, crabbing and scale-fishing boats and seafood-processing plants lining the shores just a bit upriver
    from the new Knight Convention Center. You often can tell that you're in the vicinity of a seafood plant by the hundreds of pelicans sitting on docks, boats and pilings, waiting patiently for the scraps.
    There always are any number of older boats that obviously have seen better days and are in the process of restoration. But it also is along the river that you will see one of the most beautiful old boats in South Florida, a ketch called Scruples.
    William Garvey is a former Miami resident who currently serves as editor of Professional Pilot magazine in Washington, D.C. He made his first trip up the river during a recent business trip here and was fascinated by what he saw.
    "I'll bet most of the people in Miami have no idea all this is here," he said as he motored along slowly behind two tugboats that were cajoling, urging, and muscling a freighter up the river and around its bends. "This is a real, working river, like the rivers in Europe."
    Scott Good, who has lived in Miami for 36 years and is a supervisor at the Merrill Stevens boat yard, agrees with Garvey's assessment. When he finally got around to taking a trip all the way up the river a couple of months ago, Good said he was stunned to find that an entire marine subculture existed that he knew nothing about.
    "When you get up near the airport, you find yourself going through a canyon of freighters. It's really an impressive trip," Good says. "I'd recommend it to anybody. I know I had a great time."
    Keys
    Bob Klein is as close to a Conch as you can get without being born in the Florida Keys. This son of Miami has lived in the Upper Keys since he was 17 -- "I first moved here on VJ Day, 1944 -- and he has been taking people to the offshore reefs as a professional diving guide for 25 years.
    "This has got to be the greatest single place in the world for boating. We have year-round summer, warm, clear water, great reefs and marine life, and thousands of creeks and islands to explore," Klein says.
    For the skipper who has three days to a week, few places offer more to see and do than the Keys.
    The Keys share much of the tropical charm of the Bahamas, with the advantage that most things are cheaper.
    The Keys essentially start with Elliott Key, the big island that forms the seaward border of South Biscayne Bay, but many skippers don't consider themselves in the Keys until they pass southward under the Card Sound Bridge or make it through Jewfish Creek.
    A good overnight stopping point only about 30 miles south of Miami is Pumpkin Key on the east side of Card Sound, off the northern tip of Key Largo. Although the key is privately owned, the water around it is public, and well-protected holding grounds are found off the northeast and southeast corners of the island.
    The water here is usually gin-clear and a great place for kids to swim, snorkel and ski. Pumpkin Key also is only a few minutes away from Angelfish Creek, a cut that allows small boats to pop out into the Atlantic when weather permits or duck inside the Keys to safety when a storm threatens.
    The Upper Keys, from Key Largo to Islamorada, offer spectacular diving year round. The fishing is always good for some species or another, and Florida Bay, on the inside of the Keys, is a delightful getaway spot for the person with a small powerboat or shoal draft sailboat.
    Just pick an island (stay far enough off that the mosquitoes don't bother you in summer), drop anchor and you have instant Swiss Family Robinson.
    "My favorite times of year are May and October," says Klein, who runs the dive boat Plus Ultra out of Port Largo Villas in Upper Key Largo. "The water is warm those months, and it can get so clear you can't believe it."
    Klein's boat is a 50-foot Cary, an oversized deep vee that tops 35 miles per hour and charters for 10 or 12 divers at $350 a day. He roams the reefs from John Pennekamp Coral Reef Underwater State Park on the north to Alligator Light on the south.
    His favorite reefs are Carysfort, in the state park, "because of the beautiful underwater scenery. It's such a big reef that it has something of everything. It's got shallow water and deep water, ledges and gullies and caves. It's the best for everything -- diving, underwater scenery, fishing, or just wandering around in a boat.
    "And I like Little Conch Reefs (a few miles farther south), not so much for the beauty of the coral but for the extreme richness of the marine life," he says.
    Rodriguez Key, just offshore from Rock Harbor about 50 miles southwest of Miami, is a great place to anchor on the first night of any trip from Dade or Broward. It offers a lee shore against anything except a solid norther, and you can dinghy in quickly to have dinner or buy supplies on shore.
    The next stop, 20 miles down the way, is Islamorada, a fairly sophisticated little town that offers a long list of marinas and restaurants for those tired of shipboard cooking and hotels for those tired of shipboard berths.
    From here on, you will find a good place to moor or tie up every 20 miles or so, including Long Key State Park, Marathon, Bahia Honda State Park, Newfound Harbor (another excellent overnight anchorage) and Key West -- which, depending on your point of view, is the jewel or the clinker in the island bracelet formed by the Keys.
    The inside route to the Keys, down Florida Bay, has a different kind of charm: shallow waters sprinkled with islets stretching to the horizon. At Big Spanish Channel, about four miles east of Big Pine Key, the inside route takes you northwest and then west along a wondrous maze of islands and channels where you can find dozens of anchorages that offer superb fishing and delightful sailing and cruising.
    Cross Florida Waterway
    A round trip between Miami and Fort Myers (430 statute miles) on this delightful and unusual waterway is at least a four-day weekend trip for a powerboat that can do 20 knots, or a two-week vacation for sailors. If you have a trailerable boat, you can cut out about 190 miles of the least interesting and most crowded waters by driving to the St. Lucie Locks, about 15 miles up the St. Lucie River from the Intracoastal, and launching the boat there. This procedure would make the round trip, or at least a large chunk of it, within reasonable limits for a three-day weekend in a powerboat.
    Some pre-planning should be done by boaters on the Okeechobee Waterway. First, although you can honk along at 30 miles per hour in many sections, there are some places -- especially along the Upper Caloosahatchee River -- where waterfront development and the need to negotiate locks requires that any prudent and polite skipper follow a no-wake policy.
    Next, the maximum mast height permissible for a sailboat is about 48 feet, and the maximum depth a boat can draw is eight feet.
    Locks operate between 6 a.m. and 9:30 p.m. Plan your
    arrivals and overnight stops to coincide with those operating hours. If you arrive too late, you must spend the night at a waterway marina, motel or at the lock. Some locks offer camping and shower facilities.
    Fuel stops are available every 20 miles or less, with the Indiantown Marina a popular stop on the St. Lucie above the locks. On the rim route and the Caloosahatchee, at least 11 marinas offer both gasoline and diesel fuel, and several others offer gasoline only. The Clewiston Inn advertises that it will pick up visiting boaters at dockside, drive them to the inn to have dinner or spend the night, then return them to their boats.
    In addition to the standard charts for the waterway, carry a copy of The Waterway Guide, Southern Edition, available for $12.50 in many marine hardware stores. This book is the bible of waterway travelers and offers information on everything from what marinas have restaurants to telephone numbers to call for weather information.
    Going through a lock is easy and requires 10-15 minutes. The lockmasters generally are cheerful and helpful. While you should have lines of your own handy, they usually prefer to toss lines to you. If you have any questions about locking through, you can tie up before entering the lock and ask the lockmaster for advice.
    The Intracoastal Waterway meets the Okeechobee Waterway's eastern edge at Stuart, where the St. Lucie River flows into the sea. It is possible to miss the left turn into the relatively narrow opening to the South Fork of the St. Lucie River (which becomes the St. Lucie Canal), so keep a chart handy to make sure you follow the correct daymarks shortly after you pass
    Horseshoe Point.
    Once you slip under the Florida Turnpike Bridge about 14 miles up the river, you will have left urban life behind and can enjoy a rural idyll for the next 120 miles.
    The jump from sea level to Lake Okeechobee level on the eastern side is made in two stages. The first is the biggest, a 15-foot rise in the St. Lucie Locks 15 miles west of Stuart.
    From here to the lake, the river is 28 miles of peace and quiet, mostly tucked down deep between high banks so you are unaware of the highway on one side.
    You know you're almost at the Port Mayaca Lock when you see the tall railroad lift bridge spanning the river. After entering the lock, it is about a four-foot rise to the level of the lake, which you enter immediately once the western lock gates swing open.
    Lake Okeechobee remains extremely fascinating to boaters as well as anglers. Here are roughly 1,200 square miles of fresh water to scoot around on, and there's usually not another sailboat in sight.
    While the quickest route across the Lake Okeechobee section is straight across open water, a wise small-boat operator will check the weather very carefully before starting out.
    If there's any question about the weather at all, small boaters should take the protected rim-canal route around the lake's southern edge. It's only 12 miles longer than heading straight across, and it's a lot more scenic.
    When you clear Port Mayaca, you must decide on your route across the lake. If you go straight across (you really make a dogleg in mid-lake, which should be negotiated carefully), it's about 24 miles to the next stop at Clewiston.
    If you decide on the rim-canal route, turn left as soon as you clear the lock and begin following the markers around the lake past Pahokee, Belle Glade and Clewiston to the next lock in Moore Haven.
    The St. Lucie Canal (which drains the lake from the east) and the Caloosahatchee River (which drains it from the west) provide relaxing rural scenery, orange groves and vegetable farms and cows by the thousands.
    The rim route, once you enter the enclosed section, is Florida as it may have appeared to the Spaniards -- wild and wonderful. This is gator and bass country, and you will see plenty of the former and should be able to catch plenty of the latter.
    When you clear the lock at Moore Haven and enter the Caloosahatchee, you will have an easy, protected 56-mile run to Fort Myers, dropping through two more locks at Ortona and Olga on the way.
    If you continue about 30 miles past Fort Myers, you will reach the Intracoastal Waterway again and can brag that you have crossed Florida from sea to shining sea.
    Caption:
    photo: Boaters during traffic jam on Biscayne Bay,
    Miami River, Sailboats on Biscayne Bay; map: South Florida
    waters, Florida Keys
    Last edited by Starless; 08-14-2009 at 12:42 PM.

  2. #12

    Default Re: Unidentified Female, Located March 9, 1981, Glades County, FL

    Interesting, wonder if this doctor was ever located ?

    St. Petersburg Times
    May 24, 1993
    Edition: CITY
    Section: TAMPA BAY AND STATE
    Page: 4B



    Topics:
    Index Terms:
    county medicine
    THE STATE



    Series: THE STATE
    Wanted: a doctor for Glades County

    Associated PressBy Associated Press

    Dateline: MOORE HAVEN


    It has been almost 14 years since Glades County's only doctor mysteriously disappeared. Ever since, civic leaders have tried to recruit a physician willing to tolerate uncertain pay and isolated living.
    ""We're trying to get the old country doctor. I don't know if doctors like that exist any more, but we hope so,'' said Dick Blackwell, the county's chief deputy clerk of court.
    There is a clinic where doctors from outside the county visit on weekdays, but locals say what they need is a full-time family doctor.
    Glades County, with a population around 8,000, is on the west side of Lake Okeechobee. Moore Haven, the county seat, sits at a bend in the road on U.S. 27 on the Caloosahatchee River. The nearest doctor is 18 miles away in Clewiston. Some people travel 31 miles to La Belle, 34 miles to Okeechobee, or 60 miles to Fort Myers for care.
    The dilemma started July 6, 1979. Law enforcement officials recall the date because it's rare for anyone to disappear in Glades County, much less someone as prominent as the only physician.
    Dr. Albert Johnson might have been a bit old-fashioned in technique, but no one seems to have a bad thing to say about him. He was nicknamed ""Five-dollar'' after his standard fee fo everything from a checkup to a house call.
    One afternoon, Johnson, 73, came home from his office. Two hours later he wasn't there when patients arrived for an appointment. He didn't come to the office the next day.
    Inside the house, law enforcement agents found his constant companion, a cocker spaniel named Porkin; a pot of rabbit stew on the stove; and a running fan, turned toward the empty chair where the doctor usually sat.
    No body was found, and the case remains open.
    Investigators believe he was murdered. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement came up with suspects 11 years ago, but doesn't have enough evidence for an arrest.
    When it became clear Johnson wasn't going to return, a task force was established to find a new doctor. They submitted letters to magazines, hospitals and universities, and even strung a sign across the main street: ""This town needs a doctor.''
    Shannon Hall, whom the county commissioners recently put in charge of the ""doctor committee,'' said she now realizes the problem boils down to money, which the county doesn't have.
    She plans to meet with state officials about getting a grant.
    ""I'm looking for any kind of a grant or good Samaritan or Ross Perot, or anybody that can help us find a physician,'' she said.

    Caption:
    Map locating Glades County
    BLACK AND WHITE MAP
    Last edited by Starless; 08-14-2009 at 12:42 PM.

  3. #13

    Default Re: Unidentified Female, Located March 9, 1981, Glades County, FL

    Another Bar:
    Miami Herald, The (FL)
    February 18, 1988
    Edition: STATE
    Section: TRSR CST
    Page: 1B

    CITY DECLARES BAR A NUISANCE, SHUTS IT DOWN

    Author: Herald Staff

    Dateline: FORT PIERCE

    The Corner Tavern was closed Wednesday after the Fort Pierce City Commission voted unanimously Tuesday night to declare it a public nuisance and order its immediate shutdown, Acting City Manager James "Bo" Powell said.
    Acting Police Chief Ronnie Parker told commissioners reports of crimes at the bar at 13th Street and Orange Avenue had tripled between 1986 and 1987. "If the city determines the place is a public nuisance, the city can revoke a public occupational license," Powell said.
    In the past, commissioners have granted problem businesses time to make changes, but Powell said the situation at the Corner Tavern was too severe. The crimes included robberies and aggravated assaults with guns, officials said.
    Bar owner James Harmon said Wednesday he's unsure if he'll take any action because of the closing. "You have a right to have a business," Harmon said. "I think a lot of things have to be taken into consideration."
    WORKER PULLED TO SAFETY
    FROM COLLAPSED DITCH
    PORT ST. LUCIE -- A Fort Pierce construction worker was trapped in a collapsed ditch Wednesday and had to be pulled out by co-workers as the ditch started to fill with water, Port St. Lucie police reported.
    Leo Roy Moore, 37, of 209 N. 21st St., was working in a hole dug by Owl & Associates for a sewer force main line at Westmoreland Boulevard and Adair Road. The sides of the 10-foot- deep hole collapsed on him at about noon and covered him with dirt, police said.
    Other workers immediately uncovered Moore's head and pulled him out as the hole filled with water, police said. Moore was treated and released from HCA Medical Center of Port St. Lucie.
    Officials suspect a broken water main caused the hole to collapse.
    NEELY TURNS HIMSELF IN;
    SENTENCING ERROR CLEARED
    STUART -- Todd Neely has turned himself in to jail officers now that court personnel have cleared up the clerical error that released him three hours into a 30-day sentence for beer and marijuana possession, his mother said.
    County Judge David Harper sentenced Neely to 30 days as part of Neely's agreement with prosecutors but wrote down three days plus time served. Neely, 20, was released Friday afternoon, three hours after being put in jail.
    Neely gained notoriety after being convicted in a June 1986 attempted-murder case, although his family testified he was having dinner with them 12 miles from the crime scene.
    The victim and her friend identified Neely in court as the assailant, but his lawyers say it is a case of mistaken identity. He is appealing the conviction and a 15-year prison term.
    The beer and pot charges stem from an unrelated October arrest in which a Martin County sheriff's deputy found Budweiser and a small amount of marijuana in his car.
    COPS SEEK IDENTITY OF BODY
    FOUND ON BANK OF CANAL
    FORT PIERCE -- A body was found Wednesday along the north side of the Belcher Canal near North 42nd Street.
    Sheriff's spokesman Lou Ericsson said the body appeared to be that of a woman who had been dead several days. It was found lying face down midway down the canal bank, Ericsson said.
    Officials had not touched the body and were awaiting investigators from the medical examiner's office late Wednesday, Ericsson said. He said a man walking along the bank spotted the body about 6:30 p.m. and notified police.




    Memo:
    ALONG THE COAST
    Copyright (c) 1988 The Miami Herald
    Record Number: 8801130119
    Last edited by Starless; 08-14-2009 at 12:41 PM.

  4. #14

    Default Re: Unidentified Female, Located March 9, 1981, Glades County, FL

    More about that missing doctor, hmmmmm....
    St. Petersburg Times
    October 30, 1988
    Edition: CITY
    Section: NATIONAL
    Page: 1A


    Topics:
    Index Terms:
    police election biography article

    Next sheriff of Glades will know 2 sides of the law

    Author: LUCY MORGAN

    Dateline: MOORE HAVEN



    MOORE HAVEN - Welcome to Glades County, where you get charged extra if you clean fish or game in your motel room and where the candidates for sheriff this year are a little bit out of the ordinary.
    The next man who wears a sheriff's star in Glades County will have experience on both sides of the law. You might say both candidates in one of Florida's poorest counties have ''records'' to run on.
    The Republican, James R. ''Jim'' Mansfield, 53, has had three run-ins with the law during the past seven years. Twice, he was arrested by deputies in Glades and Hendry counties. A third time, one man was killed and Mansfield and another man were wounded in a shootout.
    ''I killed the first one,'' Mansfield said last week when asked about the shooting. ''I shot Barton (the other wounded man), and if I hadn't run out of bullets, he'd be dead, too. I can protect myself, that's why I'd be a good sheriff.''
    The Democrat, former Sheriff's Deputy Charles J. ''Chuck'' Schramm, 47, was a sergeant with the Glades County Sheriff's Department until he resigned to run in July. But Schramm hasn't been throwing rocks at his opponent's record, perhaps because his own past includes a 1964 negligent homicide arrest in Washington, D.C., though Schramm was acquitted of the charge at a trial.
    It's a situation that State Attorney Joseph D'Alessandro, whose five-county jurisdiction includes Glades County, finds troubling.
    ''I am concerned to a degree,'' D'Alessandro said last week. ''But there is not too much I can do about it.''
    The two men are seeking office in a county where the sheriff's department is no stranger to trouble. It's been only eight years since Chief Deputy Howard Bowen was arrested and accused of stealing marijuana from the evidence room at the county jail, then staging a robbery to cover up the theft, and trying to kill another sheriff's deputy by shooting at him and blowing up his car. In 1986, Bowen was arrested again in Holmes County and sentenced to 15 years in prison for trafficking in marijuana.
    With 5,592 residents, Glades is among Florida's least-populated and poorest counties. It is nestled against Lake Okeechobee. Most of its residents make a living either by fishing, raising cattle, or growing citrus or sugar cane. Lykes Bros., the shipping and agriculture conglomerate, owns most of the land in Glades County and is easily the county's biggest taxpayer.
    Moore Haven, the county seat and only incorporated city, has one traffic light that operates part time. State transportation officials let the city turn on the red light only when school buses are going and coming from the county's only high school and only elementary school.
    Moore Haven's only modern motel, a Red Carpet Inn, has signs posted in every room: ''Please No Fish and Game Cleaning in Rooms. Guests will be assessed extra cleaning charge for violation.''
    The county's only doctor mysteriously disappeared in 1981, leaving his pet cocker spaniel alone and a pan of meat cooking on the stove. Many folks believe the doctor was murdered by drug addicts and his body left among the many alligators that populate the area.
    The wide-open spaces that abound in Glades County often give way to a sort of ''wild west'' atmosphere that has included displays of fisticuffs in town meetings. Folks here take their politics seriously. Earlier this month when voter turnout around the state was about 20 percent everywhere else, Glades County had a 62 percent turnout.
    ''Politics here is taken very dear to heart,'' said sheriff's candidate Schramm, who is strongly favored to win in a county where Democrats outnumber Republicans 3,320 to 579. ''I've seen families break up because of differences over candidates. Many people won't openly support a candidate.''
    Traditionally it is the race for sheriff that commands the most attention, and this year's defeat of incumbent Sheriff C. Russell Henderson has resulted in some unusually bitter feelings.
    State Attorney D'Alessandro seized and sealed all of the election ballots after the first primary, and state elections officials sent an observer to watch the counting of the vote in the runoff between Sheriff Henderson and Schramm, his former deputy. D'Alessandro said grand juries have repeatedly investigated problems with Glades County elections.
    ''An election is sort of a social event in Glades County,'' explained D'Alessandro. ''People gather at the courthouse and start drinking and by the time they get around to counting, everybody is tanked up.''
    Henderson complained about the way ballots were counted after Elections Supervisor Holly Green mistakenly counted one set of ballots twice. As a result, all ballots were recounted before Schramm was declared the winner of Democratic primary. No one has officially contested the result and state officials found no irregularities in the handling of the runoff.
    Henderson, a former state trooper who has been sheriff since 1983, and some of his deputies say they don't plan to stick around when the new sheriff - whoever it may be - takes office in January.
    ''I know I'm through with politics,'' said Henderson.
    D'Alessandro described Henderson as ''a fair-to-middling'' sheriff for Glades County, but says Henderson never learned how to handle the county's residents.
    ''It's a funny place,'' says D'Alessandro. ''When somebody's house gets burglarized they don't get upset if the sheriff doesn't catch the burglar, but they do think the sheriff should call them and tell them he's sorry it happened. Henderson didn't learn to do that.''
    Glades is one of several rural South Florida counties where drug shipments have made their way into remote airstrips as smugglers take advantage of sparse populations and scarce law enforcement. Federal authorities recently announced the seizure of several thousand acres in Glades County as part of a settlement with convicted drug smuggler Frank Brady, a resident of a neighboring county.
    There is always a lot of talk about drug smuggling in law enforcement campaigns so it's no surprise that smuggling is being raised as an issue in the current campaign. And most of the talk in this campaign centers on Republican candidate Mansfield.
    Mansfield is a North Carolina native who works as a construction superintendent on a Marco Island condominium project. He says everybody around Glades County knows what sort of man he is. He denies any connection with drug smugglers, saying all of the talk is merely an attempt by sheriff's deputies to discredit him.
    ''I'm not guilty of anything and I'm not ashamed of anything,'' Mansfield said.
    In a pretrial proceeding in 1986, a sheriff's deputy said an informant had identified Mansfield as a ''major drug smuggler.'' The informant testified that Mansfield had a small amount of cocaine for sale and was trying to set up a deal that involved flying an airplane from Jamaica or Haiti.
    The testimony came after Mansfield was charged with three felonies - conspiracy to commit a burglary, conspiracy to commit arson and buying and receiving stolen property. Arrested in 1985, Mansfield pleaded no contest to a single charge of burglary on Jan. 14, 1987. A circuit judge fined him $1,000 but withheld a formal finding of guilt, a step that could have denied Mansfield the right to seek election.
    ''I wasn't guilty,'' Mansfield said last week. ''They had this boy set me up.'' Mansfield said he was arrested because he had supported the candidate who ran against the sheriff in 1984.
    In an earlier incident, Mansfield and six other men were arrested in neighboring Hendry County and accused of trying to poach an alligator. Mansfield also was charged with carrying a concealed weapon.
    The charges against Mansfield and all but one of the others were dropped. Mansfield and the others testified that they were all drunk and driving around the county shooting Mansfield's .22 Magnum rifle when they were stopped by Hendry County deputies and game officers.
    Mansfield said he was asleep in the back of his car when the initial shots were fired and awoke only to help his buddies get the gun unjammed. Several of the others said Mansfield was driving and they were passed out in the back seat.
    Asked during a 1983 pretrial hearing if they were ''just shooting the gun for the heck of it?'' Mansfield replied: ''Yessir, we was drunk.''
    And going further back, a bit of mystery still lingers over a 1981 shootout that left one man dead and two others, including Mansfield, wounded. Mansfield says the men were trying to rob him. State Attorney D'Alessandro, Henderson and his deputies say they believe the shooting was drug-related.
    The other man wounded in the shootout was James Edward Barton of Clewiston. A few months earlier, Barton had been arrested in Palm Beach County in connection with a 1,000-pound marijuana seizure. The year after the shootout, he was arrested in Osceola County with a planeload of marijuana.
    The man killed in the gun battle was Ralph Michael Howard, of Hallendale. He also had an extensive criminal record.
    Investigators say they have never been able to determine what actually happened when all the shooting started on a remote Glades County road, but prosecutors recently have re-opened the case.
    The other candidate for sheriff of Glades County has an arrest record of his own, though there is only one case - a charge of negligent homicide - and it is 24 years old.
    Schramm, a Chicago native and former Chicago police officer, has lived in Glades County since 1975. No matter what his opponent says about him, Schramm denies that he is trying to cover anything up. He disclosed the old arrest when he was hired by former Glades County Sheriff Roy Lundy in 1978. Schramm's record as a deputy includes a number of commendations, one of them from Sheriff Henderson written about a year ago.
    ''He didn't try to hide'' his arrest, Lundy said last week. ''He told me about it right up front. I didn't spread it around; he was acquitted. But there was a report on it in his personnel file.''
    That report is now missing. Schramm said the negligent homicide charge was made by Washington, D.C., police in 1964 after a traffic accident. Schramm said a jury acquitted him of the charge. Records in Washington have since been discarded and are unavailable, but Lundy confirmed Schramm's description of the accident.
    Schramm said he and the other driver had both been drinking before the accident, which happened while Schramm was in the U.S. Navy stationed in Washington. Schramm said the other driver died, not from injuries sustained in the accident, but from an allergic reaction to anesthesia given by doctors who were setting his broken jaw.
    ''Today the doctor and the hospital would have been sued,'' Schramm said. ''Back then they just charged me with negligent homicide. I know I have to live with this for the rest of my life.''

    Caption:
    C. Russell Henderson; James R. Mansfield; Charles J. Schramm; map of Florida locates Glades County
    BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO, (3)
    COLOR MAP
    Last edited by Starless; 08-14-2009 at 12:40 PM.

  5. #15

    Default Re: Unidentified Female, Located March 9, 1981, Glades County, FL


  6. #16

    Default Re: Unidentified Female, Located March 9, 1981, Glades County, FL


  7. #17

    Default Re: Unidentified Female, Located March 9, 1981, Glades County, FL

    Bad People Everywhere, even once in Moore Haven:

    Moore Haven Corrections Officer Charged With Sexual Battery
    http://ap.tbo.com/ap/florida/MGAZFMPZ2LD.html
    The Associated Press
    Published: Sep 26, 2003
    MOORE HAVEN, Fla. (AP) - A corrections officer at the Moore Haven Correctional Facility was arrested Friday on charges of sexual battery on a child now living in Canada.

    John Kevin Brock, 42, of LaBelle, was charged with two counts of sexual battery on a child and one count of lewd and lascivious exhibition of a child.

    Brock, also the former police chief in the central Florida town of Zolfo Springs, was held at Glades County Jail on $65,000 bond. The jail did not have any attorney information for him.

    The victim, a former Glades County resident now living in Canada, was interviewed by Florida law enforcement in Ontario, the Daily Okeechobee News reported for Saturday editions. The incident had been reported to the Niagara Falls Child Abuse Unit.

    Brock was chief of police in Zolfo Springs from 1994 to 1995. He is a captain at the correctional facility. ---

    Information from: The Daily Okeechobee News

    AP-ES-09-26-03 2151EDT

  8. #18

    Default Re: Unidentified Female, Located March 9, 1981, Glades County, FL

    Wonder how long this prison has been here:
    Moore Haven Correctional Facility
    Post Office Box, 718501 1900 East State Rd. 78 N.W.
    Moore Haven, Florida 33471-8837
    Phone: (863)946-2420
    Fax: (863)946-3437
    E-mail: moorehavenci@mail.dc.stat e.fl.us
    Contact: Tom Levins
    Title: Warden
    Agency Number: FL022PRIV
    CJSTC Region: 10
    Last edited by Starless; 08-14-2009 at 12:39 PM.

  9. #19

    Default Re: The Trucadero Bar In Clewiston


  10. #20

    Default Re: Unidentified Female, Located March 9, 1981, Glades County, FL

    Quote Originally Posted by Starless View Post
    Interesting, wonder if this doctor was ever located ?

    St. Petersburg Times
    May 24, 1993

    Edition: CITY
    Section: TAMPA BAY AND STATE
    Page: 4B

    Topics:
    Index Terms
    county medicine
    THE STATE

    Series: THE STATE
    Wanted: a doctor for Glades County

    Associated PressBy Associated Press

    Dateline: MOORE HAVEN

    Article Text:
    It has been almost 14 years since Glades County's only doctor mysteriously disappeared. Ever since, civic leaders have tried to recruit a physician willing to tolerate uncertain pay and isolated living.
    ""We're trying to get the old country doctor. I don't know if doctors like that exist any more, but we hope so,'' said Dick Blackwell, the county's chief deputy clerk of court.
    There is a clinic where doctors from outside the county visit on weekdays, but locals say what they need is a full-time family doctor.
    Glades County, with a population around 8,000, is on the west side of Lake Okeechobee. Moore Haven, the county seat, sits at a bend in the road on U.S. 27 on the Caloosahatchee River. The nearest doctor is 18 miles away in Clewiston. Some people travel 31 miles to La Belle, 34 miles to Okeechobee, or 60 miles to Fort Myers for care.
    The dilemma started July 6, 1979. Law enforcement officials recall the date because it's rare for anyone to disappear in Glades County, much less someone as prominent as the only physician.
    Dr. Albert Johnson might have been a bit old-fashioned in technique, but no one seems to have a bad thing to say about him. He was nicknamed ""Five-dollar'' after his standard fee fo everything from a checkup to a house call.
    One afternoon, Johnson, 73, came home from his office. Two hours later he wasn't there when patients arrived for an appointment. He didn't come to the office the next day.
    Inside the house, law enforcement agents found his constant companion, a cocker spaniel named Porkin; a pot of rabbit stew on the stove; and a running fan, turned toward the empty chair where the doctor usually sat.
    No body was found, and the case remains open.
    Investigators believe he was murdered. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement came up with suspects 11 years ago, but doesn't have enough evidence for an arrest.
    When it became clear Johnson wasn't going to return, a task force was established to find a new doctor. They submitted letters to magazines, hospitals and universities, and even strung a sign across the main street: ""This town needs a doctor.''
    Shannon Hall, whom the county commissioners recently put in charge of the ""doctor committee,'' said she now realizes the problem boils down to money, which the county doesn't have.
    She plans to meet with state officials about getting a grant.
    ""I'm looking for any kind of a grant or good Samaritan or Ross Perot, or anybody that can help us find a physician,'' she said.

    Caption:
    Map locating Glades County
    BLACK AND WHITE MAP
    Well, he isnt in the FDLE search or doe network, so maybe they found him ???

    http://pas.fdle.state.fl.us/pas/pers...ersonsSearch.a
    Last edited by Starless; 08-14-2009 at 12:38 PM.

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