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Thread: LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona

  1. #1

    glitter14 LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona

    Miss X' Identity
    Still Big Mystery
    Who is she? Where did she
    come from? Did she have parents,
    or any family
    Those are some of the questions
    puzzling the sheriff's office as
    they trace lead after lead on Miss
    X, the skeleton of a young girl
    found a few miles south of Grand


    Canyon National Park last October 31.
    To dale, Sheriff Cecil Richardson
    and his deputies have sent out
    over a thousand circulars describing,
    as best they could, what was
    found, where it was found, and
    a vague general description of
    what Miss X might have looked
    like alive.
    Richardson said Saturday that
    in response his office had received
    well over "100 replies, inquiries,
    pictures, and descriptions"
    concerning missing girls from all
    parts of the country. About one
    in five of these have merited
    keeping and running further
    checks on, he said, but none have

    led to anything definite.

    Richardson also showed a copy


    of a movie magazine he had received
    in connection with this
    case. In the magazine was an article
    about stars who have faded
    suddenly after fast starts, and in
    the article was a picture of Dana
    Wynters.
    Someone had circled Miss Wynlers'
    picture and sent the magazine
    on to Richardson. The Sheriff
    added he had also received
    copies of several detective-type
    magazines in connection with the
    case. . .
    Richardson pointed out there
    are many missing girls in the
    United Slates each year, and that
    the location of Miss X's remains
    makes it really hard to say what
    part of the country she came
    from.
    He noted that Grand Canyon
    has people from all over the world
    visit it each year, and therefore
    Miss X could be a resident of
    anywhere.
    To date, doctors, dentists, and
    one anthropologist from the Museum
    of Northern Arizona, Christy
    G. Turner II, have viewed the
    body. Each report varies, but
    they have averaged out to say
    that Miss X was a female somewhere
    in the 13-17 age range, her
    racial classification was Caucasoid-
    Mongoloid, and she had dark
    brown hair, bleached light.
    The strongest point for identification,
    Richardson noted, was
    her teeth. They are listed on the
    circular as, "in excellent condition,
    seven fillings in four teeth,
    third molars unerupted."
    But even this point has its weak
    spot, Richardson added. Contrary
    to popular belief there are not
    dental charts on all persons with

    fillings.
    He said that some institutions,
    such as schools, do not make
    charts when dentisls fill students
    teeth. It is entirely possible, he
    added, that Miss X attended such
    a school.
    Miss X's clothing was far too
    common to make for any really
    positive identification, Richardson
    explained. Found near the skeleton
    were a pair of Capri pants,
    a white cardigan wool sweater,
    and several items of underclothing.
    All were of common, mass
    manufacture.
    Miss X was not buried, but remained
    in a prone position on the
    ground for 9 to 12 months it is estimated.
    The circular states,
    "Positively there before Spring of
    1958 and very likely late summer
    of 1957."
    Her clothing was apparently removed
    and then the body was removed
    some 75 feet south of an
    adjacent road and placed on the
    ground.
    So Richardson and his deputies
    keep waiting for an answer to Miss
    X's identity, and somewhere in
    the country perhaps a family, a
    young husband, a steady

    boyfriend are all waiting too.


    THE SUN
    Monday, May 25, 1959
    Last edited by Starless; 11-30-2010 at 01:51 PM.

  2. #2

    Default Re: LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona

    Arizona Daily Sun
    Tuesday, November 4, 1958


    SKELETON FIND MAY BE GIRL IN HER TEENS

    A skeleton found by deer hunt
    ers in the Moqui district of the
    Kaibab National Forest has been
    tentatively identified as that of a
    young - woman who was probably
    in her teens at he time of her
    death.
    'Sheriff Cecil Richardson, who
    first said he believed the bones
    to be the remains of a young man.
    said anthropologists at the Museum
    of Northern Arizona issued the
    latest findings.
    Richardson also said he is having
    extensive tests made by dentists,
    doctors and the anthropologists
    to attempt to get additional
    information to reconstruct the size
    and nationality of the person.
    At the same time, sheriff's officers
    prepared to conduct a search
    of the same area Wednesday for a
    second skeleton, also reported by
    hunters.
    In addition to the two skeletons,
    Richardson reported, a saddle was
    also found in the area.

    ______________
    Last edited by Starless; 11-30-2010 at 01:51 PM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona

    2nd Skeleton
    Believed Old
    Indian Grave
    GRAND CANYON (Special) -
    The Cococino County sheriff's office
    Thursday found itself with
    only one skeleton on its hands.
    Sheriff Cecil Richardson and
    Deputy Paul (Bud) Dunagan said
    they have concluded a skeleton
    found 15 miles southwest of here
    Deputy Paul (Bud) Dunagan said
    by deer hunters from Winslow
    came from an Indian grave.
    J. A. Myers and I. C. McAllister,
    the hunters, Wednesday afternoon
    led officers to the site where they
    noticed the skeleton late last week.
    Richardson said they not only
    found the skeleton of an Indian
    adult, .but also the skeleton of his
    horse and his saddle" and gun.
    "There is no question it is a
    burial site and we did no more
    than pile more rocks over the site,"
    Richardson said.'
    The sheriff also said he is making
    some progress in an attempt lo
    identify another skeleton found in
    the Moqui area on the Kaibab
    National Forest over the weekend.
    Richardson said he has some
    leads which lie is checking out as
    to the-identity of the person, believed
    to be a girl who was in her

    teens at the time of her death.

    __________________
    Last edited by Starless; 11-30-2010 at 01:52 PM.

  4. #4
    Texaskowgirl Guest

    Default Re: LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona

    Bump... Per the Connie Smith thread...

  5. #5

    Default Re: LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona


  6. #6

    Default Re: LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona

    Quote Originally Posted by Starless View Post
    Miss X' Identity

    Still Big Mystery
    Who is she? Where did she
    come from? Did she have parents,
    or any family
    Those are some of the questions
    puzzling the sheriff's office as
    they trace lead after lead on Miss
    X, the skeleton of a young girl
    found a few miles south of Grand


    Canyon National Park last October 31.
    To dale, Sheriff Cecil Richardson
    and his deputies have sent out
    over a thousand circulars describing,
    as best they could, what was
    found, where it was found, and
    a vague general description of
    what Miss X might have looked
    like alive.
    Richardson said Saturday that
    in response his office had received
    well over "100 replies, inquiries,
    pictures, and descriptions"
    concerning missing girls from all
    parts of the country. About one
    in five of these have merited
    keeping and running further
    checks on, he said, but none have

    led to anything definite.


    Richardson also showed a copy


    of a movie magazine he had received
    in connection with this
    case. In the magazine was an article
    about stars who have faded
    suddenly after fast starts, and in
    the article was a picture of Dana
    Wynters.
    Someone had circled Miss Wynlers'
    picture and sent the magazine
    on to Richardson. The Sheriff
    added he had also received
    copies of several detective-type
    magazines in connection with the
    case. . .
    Richardson pointed out there
    are many missing girls in the
    United Slates each year, and that
    the location of Miss X's remains
    makes it really hard to say what
    part of the country she came
    from.
    He noted that Grand Canyon
    has people from all over the world
    visit it each year, and therefore
    Miss X could be a resident of
    anywhere.
    To date, doctors, dentists, and
    one anthropologist from the Museum
    of Northern Arizona, Christy
    G. Turner II, have viewed the
    body. Each report varies, but
    they have averaged out to say
    that Miss X was a female somewhere
    in the 13-17 age range, her
    racial classification was Caucasoid-
    Mongoloid, and she had dark
    brown hair, bleached light.
    The strongest point for identification,
    Richardson noted, was
    her teeth. They are listed on the
    circular as, "in excellent condition,
    seven fillings in four teeth,
    third molars unerupted."
    But even this point has its weak
    spot, Richardson added. Contrary
    to popular belief there are not
    dental charts on all persons with

    fillings.
    He said that some institutions,
    such as schools, do not make
    charts when dentisls fill students
    teeth. It is entirely possible, he
    added, that Miss X attended such
    a school.
    Miss X's clothing was far too
    common to make for any really
    positive identification, Richardson
    explained. Found near the skeleton
    were a pair of Capri pants,
    a white cardigan wool sweater,
    and several items of underclothing.
    All were of common, mass
    manufacture.
    Miss X was not buried, but remained
    in a prone position on the
    ground for 9 to 12 months it is estimated.
    The circular states,
    "Positively there before Spring of
    1958 and very likely late summer
    of 1957."
    Her clothing was apparently removed
    and then the body was removed
    some 75 feet south of an
    adjacent road and placed on the
    ground.
    So Richardson and his deputies
    keep waiting for an answer to Miss
    X's identity, and somewhere in
    the country perhaps a family, a
    young husband, a steady

    boyfriend are all waiting too.


    THE SUN

    Monday, May 25, 1959
    Wonder what they mean by "circulars" in the first article on this thread and wonder if any still exist ??

  7. #7

    Default Re: LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona

    ......In 1958, a young girl’s remains were found near Williams, Arizona. Police, who were never able to identify her, called her “Little Miss X.” Four years later, a letter received by the Connecticut State Police claimed that Little Miss X was Connie Smith. The remains were taken to the Smith ranch in Wyoming and then to Connie’s dentist in South Dakota. A comparison of the Arizona child’s teeth with Connie’s dental records was inconclusive. From there, the remains were taken to Denver where a team of forensics experts attempted to match them to Connie. Again, they were unable to definitively link the two. In 2004, the Connecticut State Police collected DNA from the Smith family, hoping to match the Smith DNA with that from Little Miss X. But, lo and behold, no one could locate the grave of the Arizona girl.....

    http://kidnappingmurderandmayhem.blo...ese-years.html

  8. #8

    star2 Description, Little Miss X

    Unidentified Female
    Located October 31, 1958
    Wearing a white cardigan wool sweater, capri pants, various undergarments/ All clothing considered common everyday clothing.Clothing was not on the body.
    She was estimated to be 13-17 years of age
    Estimated she was dead from 9-12 months
    Teeth: excellent condition, seven fillings in four teeth, third molars unerupted.
    It was estimated that she was caucasoid/mongoloid
    Dark brown hair, bleached light

  9. #9

    star2 The Kaibab National Forest

    The Sun
    Wednesday, November 19, 1958

    LION HUNT EXTRAORDINARY

    For many years after Kaibab Forest was established in 1893, the national forest and game preserve was over-run with mountain lions which were extremely destructive to the deer, one lion averaging 75 kills a year. Arizona's famous hunter, Uncle Jimmy Owens, can be credited with saving untold thousands of deer in his one-man war against the lions. Between 1907 and 1919 he killed 600 lions, almost one a week.

    Today, the Kaibab Forest, famous the country over as a hunter's and vacationer's paradise, is one of eight national forests in Arizona which are maintained at an annual cost of approximately $6 million. Last year a single Arizona industry, the malt beverage industry, paid just a shade over one billion dollars in local, state and federal taxes, enough to maintain all eight national forests for more than sixteen years....

  10. #10
    Texaskowgirl Guest

    Default Re: LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona

    Quote Originally Posted by Starless View Post
    Wonder what they mean by "circulars" in the first article on this thread and wonder if any still exist ??
    I'm pretty sure ciruclars means "flyers" or "missing person posters".... Would be interesting to see the earlier ones..... Hopefully, there's one in the police file some where that hasn't been destroyed. Argh.

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