Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst 123456
Results 51 to 57 of 57

Thread: LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona

  1. #51

    Default Re: LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona

    Miss X Skull closer
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #52

    Default Re: LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona

    The caption to the photo above says:

    Unidentified Skull/ Undersheriff Clarke Cole of Williams, Ariz. stopping in Denver Monday, shows an X-ray of a skull that he had hoped would be identified as that of Connie Smith, 10, grandaughter of a former Wyoming governor, who vanished without trace from a Connecticut YMCA more than 10 years ago. Examination of the skull by a dental surgeon has still not identified the skull, which was found in 1958 near the Grand Canyon.

  3. #53

    Default Re: LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona

    The Billings Gazette
    Tuesday, November 27,1961

    STATEMENT EXPECTED AFTER STUDY OF SKULL


    NEWCASTLE. Wyo. (UPD—
    Authorities at Flagstaff, Ariz,, are
    expected to issue a definite statement
    Tuesday concerning a skeleton
    that mny be the remains of
    10-year-old Connie Smith, who disappeared
    in 1952.
    Connie's father. Peter Smith of
    Newcastle, said Monday, "it is not
    definitely established either way,
    yet," whether the skeleton found
    in Arizona in 1958 is Connie's.
    "We're going to try to assimilate
    the information and give a release
    tomorrow. It will probably be
    available out of the sheriff's office
    in Flagstaff. All doctor's reports
    are being sent to Flagstaff," Smith
    said.
    Doctors and dentists across the
    nation have been contacted in efforts
    to connect the skeleton with
    the little girl who was last seen
    hitching a ride on route 44 in Connecticut
    in 1952. She was attending
    a YWCA camp there,
    A team of Denver doctors who
    examined the bones Saturday said
    they were reasonably certain they
    were Connie's, but after further

    examinations Sunday, announced
    there were "too many inconsistancies"
    to prove definitely.
    A Denver dental surgeon, Dr. David Berman
    said "I think the consensus of opinion
    is that this is not positively the skull
    of Connie Smith." The tentative
    identification Saturday was based on jawbone
    indentation where Connie once had a tooth
    extracted, but Berman said many persons
    have indentations in that area of the
    jawbone.
    The skull and other bones were found in 1958
    by two deer hunters near the Grand Canyon,
    Arizona. Undersheriff Clark Cole said
    whoever the skull belonged to, had probably met
    with foul play as it was found in an inaccessible area.

    Smith said at Newcastle, Monday,
    if the Tuesday findings reveal
    the skeleton was not his daughter's,
    "I will not give up, and will
    still hope she may someday be
    found."
    He said he had always believed
    Connie to be a victim of amnesia
    If the findings prove negative, he
    said, "we will continue to look for
    a tall girl suffering from amnesia."


    Smith is six-feet, seven inches tall
    and Connie's mother, who died
    last year, was six feet tall
    The girl was the granddaughter
    of former Wyoming Gov. Nels

    Smith.
    Last edited by Starless; 06-11-2011 at 09:50 PM.

  4. #54

    Default Re: LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona

    http://azdailysun.com/blogs/criminal...9bb2963f4.html

    Her skeletal remains were found Oct. 31, 1958, on a little hillside off a dirt road on Skinner Ridge south of Grand Canyon National Park.
    Her body was unclothed, prone. The body had been there for nine to 14 months.
    The coroner’s inquest, conducted while Cecil Richardson was Coconino County sheriff, has been lost to time. The name on her case file is “Little Miss X.”
    “But it was investigated as a homicide the whole time,” said Joe Sumner, volunteer investigator for the Coconino County Sheriff’s Office cold case unit.
    The cold case unit is currently working on trying to solve nearly 40 cold cases in the county like the Little Miss X’s. Sumner, who retired from the National Park Service in 2007 as a criminal investigator, came onto the cold case unit in 2008.
    “She’s never been identified,” Sumner said. “This is our oldest case that’s considered a homicide.”
    Complicating the investigation, clothes were found near the body a short time after Little Miss X’s body was discovered. There was also a comb and a nail file case. The clothes did not appear to fit and the nail file case could have belonged to a young woman who went missing the same year out of Southern California named Donis “Pinky” Redman. Redman was eventually excluded. She was 15 and didn't match the physical characteristics of Little Miss X. The car of her boyfriend, Michael Griffin, was found abandoned in Williams.
    Bones found in the old Flagstaff Mortuary several years ago from Williams dating back to the 1960s were thought to belong to Griffin. The bones were exhumed by the Flagstaff Police Department recently, but they were determined not to belong to Griffin.
    Sumner, who said Little Miss X’s case has been popular on the Internet with amateur sleuths, discovered that several young girls were reported missing at the time. Lots of hard work has gone into trying to get Little Miss X identified.
    Excluded from the investigation was the case of Mary M. Begay, 20, who went missing at the South Rim in August 1957. Also excluded was the case of Connie Smith, a 10-year-old girl who went missing in Connecticut in 1952. The body, when it was exhumed in 1962, ruled out that it belonged to Smith.
    To make the investigation more difficult for the cold case unit, there’s a bit of a problem with securing DNA samples for a comparison in the FBI national database.
    “We don’t know where her body is buried,” Sumner said. After the 1962 exhumation, there is no record of where Little Miss X was reburied. He said he believes it is likely back at Citizens Cemetery.
    “We’ve combed over the old burial records of the time and haven’t been able to figure out where she might be,” Sumner said.
    So, what’s the key to the case?
    “The key, of course, is getting her identified,” Sumner said. “It’s frustrating, It could be a case that if we do get her identified, everything else might fall into place.”
    The investigation, although stuck when it comes to securing a DNA sample, is still not dead. There are still detailed dental records, but they are 55 years old.
    “She was well cared for,” Sumner said. “Somebody was missing her at the time.”
    If anybody has information about this case, contact the sheriff’s office cold case division at 774-4523, or visit the Facebook page.

  5. #55

    Default Re: LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona

    Little Miss X

    Age: 13-17, but possibly as young as 11
    Race: Caucasoid, possibly Hispanic
    Height: 5 feet to 5 feet, 3 inches tall
    Weight: About 110 pounds
    Features: Brown skin, dark brown hair bleached to light brown with a permanent wave
    Teeth: Excellent condition with seven fillings
    Current status: Burial location unknown

    Coconino County Sheriff Cecil Richardson and Deputy Johnny Ortiz look over the case file of Little Miss X in this old photo from the sheriff's office. (Coconino County Sheriff's Office/Courtesy photo
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Last edited by Starless; 10-30-2013 at 07:10 AM.

  6. #56

    Default Re: LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona

    Cold Case Close-up -- File: Little Miss X (1958)


    http://azdailysun.com/blogs/criminal...9bb2963f4.html

    Her skeletal remains were found Oct. 31, 1958, on a little hillside off a dirt road on Skinner Ridge south of Grand Canyon National Park.

    Her body was unclothed, prone. The body had been there for nine to 14 months.

    The coroner’s inquest, conducted while Cecil Richardson was Coconino County sheriff, has been lost to time. The name on her case file is “Little Miss X.”

    “But it was investigated as a homicide the whole time,” said Joe Sumner, volunteer investigator for the Coconino County Sheriff’s Office cold case unit.

    The cold case unit is currently working on trying to solve nearly 40 cold cases in the county like the Little Miss X’s. Sumner, who retired from the National Park Service in 2007 as a criminal investigator, came onto the cold case unit in 2008.

    “She’s never been identified,” Sumner said. “This is our oldest case that’s considered a homicide.”

    Complicating the investigation, clothes were found near the body a short time after Little Miss X’s body was discovered. There was also a comb and a nail file case. The clothes did not appear to fit and the nail file case could have belonged to a young woman who went missing the same year out of Southern California named Donis “Pinky” Redman. Redman was eventually excluded. She was 15 and didn't match the physical characteristics of Little Miss X. The car of her boyfriend, Michael Griffin, was found abandoned in Williams.

    Bones found in the old Flagstaff Mortuary several years ago from Williams dating back to the 1960s were thought to belong to Griffin. The bones were exhumed by the Flagstaff Police Department recently, but they were determined not to belong to Griffin.

    Sumner, who said Little Miss X’s case has been popular on the Internet with amateur sleuths, discovered that several young girls were reported missing at the time. Lots of hard work has gone into trying to get Little Miss X identified.



    Excluded from the investigation was the case of Mary M. Begay, 20, who went missing at the South Rim in August 1957. Also excluded was the case of Connie Smith, a 10-year-old girl who went missing in Connecticut in 1952. The body, when it was exhumed in 1962, ruled out that it belonged to Smith.

    To make the investigation more difficult for the cold case unit, there’s a bit of a problem with securing DNA samples for a comparison in the FBI national database.

    “We don’t know where her body is buried,” Sumner said. After the 1962 exhumation, there is no record of where Little Miss X was reburied. He said he believes it is likely back at Citizens Cemetery.

    “We’ve combed over the old burial records of the time and haven’t been able to figure out where she might be,” Sumner said.

    So, what’s the key to the case?

    “The key, of course, is getting her identified,” Sumner said. “It’s frustrating, It could be a case that if we do get her identified, everything else might fall into place.”

    The investigation, although stuck when it comes to securing a DNA sample, is still not dead. There are still detailed dental records, but they are 55 years old.

    “She was well cared for,” Sumner said. “Somebody was missing her at the time.”

    If anybody has information about this case, contact the sheriff’s office cold case division at 774-4523, or visit the Facebook page.







    Little Miss X




    Little Miss X

    Age: 13-17, but possibly as young as 11
    Race: Caucasoid, possibly Hispanic
    Height: 5 feet to 5 feet, 3 inches tall
    Weight: About 110 pounds
    Features: Brown skin, dark brown hair bleached to light brown with a permanent wave
    Teeth: Excellent condition with seven fillings
    Current status: Burial location unknown

    Last edited by Starless; 03-29-2016 at 07:04 AM.

  7. #57

    Default Re: LITTLE MISS X, October 31, 1958, Arizona


Page 6 of 6 FirstFirst 123456

Similar Threads

  1. Little Miss Nobody, 6-8, 1960, Prescott AZ
    By Texaskowgirl in forum SHOWCASE FORUM
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 06-02-2010, 10:24 AM
  2. Missing 2004-Miss Murray-NH & Miss Maitland-VT
    By Mja Inc Investigations in forum COLD CASE NEWS
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11-01-2009, 03:50 PM
  3. Little Miss 1565
    By Starless in forum Historical and Famous Cases
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-01-2008, 06:37 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •